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    Published on October 10th, 2012 | by Greg

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    A Duck For Every Pot: Berghoff’s Children’s Line

    We’ve seen some un­doubt­ed­ly strange things come across our desks- gad­gets of ev­ery shape and size and style, and plen­ty of odd books, movies, and more bad CDs than we can pos­si­ble list. There have been so­das that taste like turkey, and kitchen scales with at­tached iPod docks. But one of the weird­er things that we’ve seen re­cent­ly isn’t ac­tu­al­ly all that bizarre when you’re us­ing it. It’s most­ly a ques­tion: “who thought of this con­cept”.

    We’re re­fer­ring to the BergHOFF Sher­iff Duck chil­dren’s line of pots and cook­ware. The pots are re­al and de­cent- stain­less steel, with han­dles that pro­tect you from the heat. But de­sign is ev­ery­thing, and these han­dles are shaped like duck… feet? They’re or­ange, and cute, and atop each pan is what looks like a rub­ber duck­ie. These have lit­tle stars on them, in­di­cat­ing a sher­iff’s badge, and… well, we feel like we’re miss­ing part of the joke.

    Gag gift? Not so fast. Ap­par­ent­ly, par­ents like them to en­cour­age the young ones in the kitchen- now you, too, can put child la­bor to use over the stove. We’re skep­ti­cal of the safe­ty of this, but heard from some par­ents that Mom and Dad could use them to pre­pare food and then show ju­nior the pots and pans to make it look more fun. Maybe we’re get­ting old, but still: ducks? Sher­iffs? On our pots and pans? We tried out the cov­ered casse­role- yep, re­al­ly- but they have a 6-piece and even 12-piece line. The apron and the chef’s hat we can cer­tain­ly get be­hind. But even though these pans were OK- fair­ly lightweight, dish­wash­er safe- we felt sil­ly even with a cou­ple of chil­dren around.

    Avail­able now, on­line and in stores, for $80 for the six piece set (in­clud­ing the lids).

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    About the Author

    Greg dreamed up the idea for the Truly Network while living in Hawaii, which began with a single site called TrulyObscure. In 2010, when advertisers and readers were requesting coverage beyond the scope of that site, TrulyNet was launched, reaching a broader audience over a variety of niche sites. Formerly the head technology correspondent for the Des Moines Register at age 16, he has since lived and worked in five states and two countries, helping a list of organizations and companies that includes the United States Census Bureau, TripAdvisor, Events Photo Group, Berlitz, and Computer Geeks. He also served as the Content Strategy Manager for HearPlanet, a multi-platform app that has reached over a million users and has been featured in the New York Times, Hemispheres Magazine, National Geographic Adventure, Fox Business News, PC Magazine, and even Apple’s own iPhone ads. Greg has written as a restaurant critic and feature journalist for a number of national and international publications, including City Weekend Magazine, Red Egg Magazine, the Newton Daily News, Capital Change Magazine, and an arm of China Daily, Beijing Weekend. In addition, he has served as a consulting editor for the Foreign Language Press of Beijing, as well as a writer and editor for the George Washington University Hatchet, the school newspaper of his alma mater. Originally from Iowa, Greg is currently living in the West Village of Manhattan.



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