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    Kitchen en550.b

    Published on November 18th, 2015 | by Greg

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    Delonghi Lattissima Touch: Convenient Coffee & Barista Foam

    Coffee may be king in the United States, but in much of the world, you’re far more likely to get a cup of espresso. And while Starbucks might be a worldwide force, as their lines can attest they sell plenty of lattes and espresso drinks alongside regular drip java. It makes sense- after all, you can brew up a pretty solid batch at home through any number of brewing methods. And while Keurig and other systems do a good job of serving single-cup coffee, espresso fans will turn to Nespresso capsules as the dominant single-cup solution for every other type of drink.

    But your average Nespresso machine can’t foam milk, and that’s a major block to getting your cappuccino. The Delonghi Lattissima Touch combines the convenience of capsule espresso and one-touch milk foaming into a single machine. That way, you can get your caffeine without having to leave the house, and you’ll be impressed by the quality too. Your local cafe will use a several thousand dollar, enormous machine which can handle it all, but you probably want something small, cute, attractive, and less expensive for your kitchen countertop or office nook.

    The Lattissima Touch, the latest generation of machines, is part of a family that includes models both more and less expensive, making this the perfect middle-ground. We’ve seen plenty of Nespresso machines in the past, and the capsules haven’t changed too much- they are consistent, offer quite a bit of variety including decaf options, and are easy to get. With a little bit of experimentation, you can turn out great shots, and build some excellent drinks from them- the machine offers simple buttons for ristretto, espresso, lungo, cappuccino, lattes, and even hot milk.

    One of the best parts of the Lattissima Touch is how quiet it is- far less noisy than most other home coffee appliances. We also loved how it can easily be cleaned- it’s mostly plastic, and is dishwasher safe. Plus, it was fairly speedy- some drinks were ready in seconds, other took more than a minute. Nespresso shots are pretty similar across different manufacturers (19 bars of pressure is standard) but the milk was impressive- consistently creamy, with some lovely foam. You will need to be careful with the milk carafe, since you can’t really leave it out, but it can easily be put into the fridge when not in use. If you want to spend a little more, you can get a touchscreen, but we were happy to have a more compact unit that was just over a foot tall. It’s available now for around $499.95 online and in stores.

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    About the Author

    Greg dreamed up the idea for the Truly Network while living in Hawaii, which began with a single site called TrulyObscure. In 2010, when advertisers and readers were requesting coverage beyond the scope of that site, TrulyNet was launched, reaching a broader audience over a variety of niche sites. Formerly the head technology correspondent for the Des Moines Register at age 16, he has since lived and worked in five states and two countries, helping a list of organizations and companies that includes the United States Census Bureau, TripAdvisor, Events Photo Group, Berlitz, and Computer Geeks. He also served as the Content Strategy Manager for HearPlanet, a multi-platform app that has reached over a million users and has been featured in the New York Times, Hemispheres Magazine, National Geographic Adventure, Fox Business News, PC Magazine, and even Apple’s own iPhone ads. Greg has written as a restaurant critic and feature journalist for a number of national and international publications, including City Weekend Magazine, Red Egg Magazine, the Newton Daily News, Capital Change Magazine, and an arm of China Daily, Beijing Weekend. In addition, he has served as a consulting editor for the Foreign Language Press of Beijing, as well as a writer and editor for the George Washington University Hatchet, the school newspaper of his alma mater. Originally from Iowa, Greg is currently living in the West Village of Manhattan.



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