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    Kitchen swivelracelette

    Published on June 16th, 2014 | by Greg

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    Hosting A World Cup Party? Get A Swissmar Swivel Raclette!

    We’re ready for tonight’s big game: the first Team USA soccer game as part of the 2014 World Cup. And while the action itself will hopefully entertain, you’ll need more than just a TV or projector to really host a party. Whatever the size of your group, apartment, or viewing, you probably don’t want to be distracted too much during the festivities, which could mean simply ordering in… or you could surprise visitors with an awesome, surprisingly inexpensive way to keep everyone occupied, satisfied, and satiated.

    Many Americans don’t seem to know what a racelette is for, much less own one. And, admittedly, it’s a bit of a specialist piece of kitchen equipment- but Swissmar’s Swivel Raclette is good for far more than just melting cheese. The stone top allows you to cook vegetables, like peppers, mushrooms, and asparagus, as well as any meats you want, or use the grill top and then switch them over to keep everything warm. There are eight separate trays and pans for the cheese, and the whole thing works like a centerpiece, allowing you to keep your eye on everything else and let guests manage their own food.

    The coolest part is right there in the name- it swivels, twisting from a four-person across the table configuration to a longer one, lengthwise. Cooking is not super fast- and is fairly casual- but is ideal for when you have a group of eight or so and want something a little unusual, with folks who don’t mind (or prefer) a little more control. It’s important but not essential that everyone likes cheese, and you don’t need to get true “raclette” cheese for this to work. It can be tough to find the real thing in the US, but you can substitute Gruyère or even Emmentaler easily. The grill is non-stick coated, which means you shouldn’t use metal utensils, and the unit can be a bit annoying to clean (like just about anything where you’re melting cheese really).

    Placement can be tough, as with any electric grill, as the cord might end up in the middle of your group and if you want to use on a table, you’ll probably need an extension cord handy. There aren’t temperature controls, so it does take a careful eye or at least a little experimentation, but that’s part of the fun of entertaining. And separate power buttons are available, so you can switch either side off as needed. It’s nicely built, with everything you need inside, including eight plastic spatulas. At the price, it’s a pretty amazing addition to any kitchen, and fun for just about everyone- your parties will never be the same with some gherkins and raclette. Available now, online and in stores, expect to spend around $150 for the Swissmar Swivel!

     

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    About the Author

    Greg dreamed up the idea for the Truly Network while living in Hawaii, which began with a single site called TrulyObscure. In 2010, when advertisers and readers were requesting coverage beyond the scope of that site, TrulyNet was launched, reaching a broader audience over a variety of niche sites. Formerly the head technology correspondent for the Des Moines Register at age 16, he has since lived and worked in five states and two countries, helping a list of organizations and companies that includes the United States Census Bureau, TripAdvisor, Events Photo Group, Berlitz, and Computer Geeks. He also served as the Content Strategy Manager for HearPlanet, a multi-platform app that has reached over a million users and has been featured in the New York Times, Hemispheres Magazine, National Geographic Adventure, Fox Business News, PC Magazine, and even Apple’s own iPhone ads. Greg has written as a restaurant critic and feature journalist for a number of national and international publications, including City Weekend Magazine, Red Egg Magazine, the Newton Daily News, Capital Change Magazine, and an arm of China Daily, Beijing Weekend. In addition, he has served as a consulting editor for the Foreign Language Press of Beijing, as well as a writer and editor for the George Washington University Hatchet, the school newspaper of his alma mater. Originally from Iowa, Greg is currently living in the West Village of Manhattan.



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